It’s becoming a bit of a habit!

Expectations

In talking with senior executives recently from a global Systems Integrator, the discussion was full of “I want my people to be able to….” and “I want my people to stop reacting badly or panicking when faced with….”

We had started our conversation on more familiar territory – exploring classroom-based skills development that had worked very well previously. “We liked what you did for us previously around relationship development and want something similar for our current teams”.

But what was now intriguing was that these executives were sharply focused on extending the capabilities of their highly technical experts in non-technical areas – in particular the areas of empathy, listening skills, resolving tensions and clear influential communication. All those so-called “soft skills”.

“They know the technology inside-out. They are the industry experts. But they lose people as soon as they dive into that technical detail. They don’t connect with, let alone excite, the other people in the room.”

Specific goals

More than once they explained their goals along the lines of …

“I wish my technical people knew….

  • how to tune into another person’s wavelength more naturally. “
  • how to adapt their style to other people”.
  • how to feel comfortable managing tensions and conflicts in the professional context.”

It should come as no surprise to us that the skills and behaviours they seek have become essential in the virtual Covid19 world. There have been many case studies and scholarly articles that articulate this permanent shift.

The solution

Getting into new habits. Habits that promote meaningful relationships. 

Having collaborated previously, we – namely Gareth Bunn Consulting and Influence and Persuade – joined forces to evolve our on-site training courses and materials into virtual bite-sized sessions, each delivering a specific relationship development outcome.

By reframing our thinking and starting from the point of: “On completion of this module, you will be able to….”, we have moved the learning of business relationship management skills on to ‘hard’ outcomes. As you would imagine our Kipper® methodology figures in a number of them. In fact, when combined, the new modules lay the path to achieving the 5 habits of mastering business relationships:

Habits 1

  • Manage perceptions
  • Drive to action
  • Communicate clearly
  • Diagnose effectively
  • Deliver strongly

This “turning things upside down” has created a suite of ‘virtual modules’. With all sessions only 90 minutes long or less, and very interactive, building up the 5 habits can be done at the speed of, and to the right level for, each individual team.

A “Pick and Mix” approach

You select the specific outcomes you want from a current list of 30.

Habits 2

It’s the new ‘Pick & Mix’ approach to personal and team development.

30 modules with clear outcomes that can be packaged into highly customised programmes for specific team needs.

Habits 3

And as we continually seek further outcomes we can enable, let us know your suggestions.

The result

Say goodbye to the days of technical experts struggling to connect with non-technical people.

Say hello to technical experts being able to master business relationships effortlessly.

If those executive concerns mirror your current people development challenges, contact us to see how the ‘Pick & Mix’ approach can work for your organisation in a virtual world.

Gareth Bunn: gareth@garethbunnconsulting.co.uk

Amanda MacAuley: amanda@influenceandpersuade.net

Habits 4

Visual aids and India PAN

Although accurate, I suspect this is an unhelpful ttle for this post. Actually, they are two unrelated things linked only because I have had the fun of running communications training programmes in India over recent years. And I thought my recent experiences with India withholding tax might be useful to some.

Visual Aids

It always surprises me that so much unhelpful and incorrect advice is given on presentation design and delivery skills. I suspect it comes from the “Give them a few tips” culture. I was running a training session recently and we were examining the use of visual aids, and the sequence which works best for an audience given the way in which our eyes, ears and brains work. It is as many of you may know: deliver the idea you wish to put over, describe what you are going to show your audience and what to look out for, then show the visual aid (and avoid talking over it!)….. and then remove it.

One of my course delegates said that he had recently been on a Consulting Skills course run by the “global University” of a major IT services supplier.The tip they provided for using visual aids (I think in this case flipcharts) was Touch, Turn and Talk. Although I understand that there may be circumstances where this sequence may be used – especially with flipcharts – as a general rule for visual aids, it is entirely the wrong way round. Perhaps it was a “tip”  conceived by someone who has been schooled in  “Show and Tell” at a tender age.

India PAN

If you do any work for an Indian company (but are registered elsewhere such as the UK) you will know that the Indian Tax Department levies withholding tax. Up until a couple of years ago this was levied at a rate of a little over 10%. So, you invoiced £8000 and the client paid you £7115.40. The client would also send you a certificate of withholding tax paid. If you are a UK registered acompany, you could offset this amount against your UK Corporation Tax later.

However, this regime changed in 2010 and new rules have been introduced by the India Tax Department which could cause you to lose money. You now need to have a PAN – a Personal Account Number – issued by the India Tax Department. It comes in the form of a credit card sized piece of plastic. If you have a PAN number for your company and can quote this to your client, they will deduct withholding tax at the rate of 10.56% and will also provide a certificate of withholding tax paid – just as before.

But now, if you do not have a PAN number, withholding tax has to be deducted at the rate of 20%. But the real rub is the fact that a certificate of deduction of withholding tax will not be issued if you do not have a PAN. So, no offset against Corporation Tax and you stand to lose 20% of your charged fees.

I did try and work out how to apply for a PAN card, but believe me, it is not easy. And, as I discovered, there are some pitfalls – things that are not included in the instructions provided with the forms on-line. But help is at hand – help that I would strongly urge you to get hold of before applying for a PAN card. In my case I used the services of the NRI Centre based in Hounslow – NRICentre.NET [nriservices@nricentre.net]. For a very modest fee, they provided much needed advice, and then took away all the hassle of dealing with the India Tax Department, including the payment of the PAN card fee.

Getting documents together and having them legally endorsed took a few days. From sending the application to the NRI Centre, it took 5 weeks before I got confirmation of my PAN number (from the NRI Centre) and a further 10 days before the plastic arrived.

So, if you are going to do work in India for an Indian registered company, it would be wise to apply for a PAN card well in advance.